An explanation of child protection

DictionaryMedicalAcronymsEncyclopediaWikipedia. Infants Persons who are under the age of legal majority—at Common Law21 years, now generally 18 years.

An explanation of child protection

Duty Of Care — adults in school have a duty of care towards children and young people, and should always act in a way which ensures their safety. We should remember that we are in a position of trust and always listen to children and reassure them about issues which concern them. Whistleblowing — Every school has whistle blowing policies and procedures and these policies are put in place to provide protection for the person against victimisation or reprisals from other members of staff physical or verbally when the concerns are genuine and accurate.

If a member of staff is the victim of reprisals then an employment tribunal may be able to take action. If any concerns about malpractice or misconduct in a school setting are raised against another member of staff then this should be reported to the safeguarding officer of the school.

Propriety and behaviour — Practitioners working with children believe that children flourish when their personal, social and emotional needs are met and where they have clear boundaries to follow for their expected behaviour. All children should learn to consider the views and feelings, needs and rights, of others and the impact that their behaviour has on people, places and objects.

Staff members will help the children develop these skills with support, encouragement, teaching and setting a good example.

An explanation of child protection

The principles that underpin how we achieve positive and considerate behaviour exist within the programme for promoting personal, social and emotional development.

Physical contact — when working with young children, adults are often rightly concerned about having any physical contact with them because of issues around safeguarding.

However, in some situations, it is appropriate to put an arm around a child e. Young children are also demonstrative and will often hug adults affectionately.

An explanation of child protection

There are some situations in which this cannot be helped e. School policy should be followed at all times. Off Site visits — When participating in off- site visits, all staff including volunteers have a duty to take reasonable care to avoid injury to themselves and others, and to cooperate to ensure that statutory duties and obligations are fulfilled.

Adults have a common law duty to act as would a reasonably prudent parent. Adults should not hesitate to act in an emergency and to take life- saving action in an extreme situation. Staff and volunteers should not be in a situation where they are alone with one child or young person away from the rest of the group.

Photography and video — Working with children and young people may involve the taking or recording of images. Any such work should take place with due regard to the law and the need to safeguard the privacy, dignity, safety and well being of children and young people.

Informed written consent from parents or carers and agreement, where possible, from the child or young person, should always be sought before an image is taken for any purpose.

Careful consideration should be given as to how activities involving the taking of images are organised and undertaken. There also needs to be an agreement as to whether the images will be destroyed or retained for further use, where these will be stored and who will have access to them.

Adults need to remain sensitive to any children who appear uncomfortable, for whatever reason, and should recognise the potential for such activities to raise concerns or lead to misunderstandings. It is not appropriate for adults to take photographs of children for their personal use.

In this way you will protect yourself if later on the child says that they have told you or that you knew previously. You should also inform managers if you have any concerns about other members of staff due to poor practice. Whistle blowing is the mechanism by which adults can voice their concerns, made in good faith, without fear of repercussion.Child protection and safeguarding means protecting children from abuse, and identifying and stopping abuse that is already happening.

Abuse of a child or young person under the . A Child Protection Social Worker is responsible for a number of different types of services designed to help families and children through various hardships and difficulties. Most often employed by state governments, a social worker specializing in children’s protection must.

The definition of a child in child protection legislation and guidance

Child protection is the protection of children from violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect. Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child provides for the protection of . Child protection is the protection of children from violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect.

Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child provides for the protection of . What is child Protection? huMan rights the convention on the rights of the child () outlines the fundamental rights of children, in-cluding the right to be protected from economic exploitation and harmful work, from all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse, and from physi-.

What is child Protection? huMan rights the convention on the rights of the child () outlines the fundamental rights of children, in-cluding the right to be protected from economic exploitation and harmful work, from all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse, and from physi-.

Child protection in the UK | NSPCC