The indian linguistic philosophies

My bibliography Debating Verbal Cognition: Bogdan Diaconescu - - Motilal Banarsidass. The theory explored in this book represents the content of the cognition derived from linguistic utterances as a paraphrase centered on a meaning element-the principal qualificand, which is qualified by other meaning elements.

The indian linguistic philosophies

Sounds are evanescent; an instant after they are pronounced they disappear. Consequently, the question arises: Similarly, though The indian linguistic philosophies speaks of actions and things involved in them, it is also arguable that acts and things which are thought to be perceived as wholes actually are not so; there is a stream of instants, none of which lasts long enough to enable a qualified cognition of complex external entities.

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How, then, can one maintain that speech units signify actual actions and things? The second point concerns theory and procedure.

Indian scholars operate with constructs in order to account for facts and behavior. This approach was evident already at an early period ca.

Some scholars reduce these to three stages, with the second encompassing the third, fourth, and fifth. There is a conception of units under which words are groups of sounds and larger units are groups of words.

One may consider that such a procedure accepts that sounds do actually come together to form larger units, but it is also possible that this is an artifact necessary for the proper description by rules of what is found in a language.

What is it that it is understood to signify? Two approaches were taken on this issue. Each of these positions was subjected to criticisms.

Word-Meaning Relations Speakers and hearers communicate and understand messages by means of words and sentences of a language they share. Thinkers of different schools engaged in arguments concerning both the nature of what is signified and the relations that link words and their meanings.

The putative wholes treated as having identity are mental constructs vikalpa. Words have mental constructs as their sources and bring about a comprehension of mental constructs.

Moreover, words and their meanings are commonly identified with each other.

The indian linguistic philosophies

However one conceives of the relation, each generation acquires a knowledge of words related to their meanings by observing how people interact. For example, a child witnesses an interaction between his father F and his grandfather G: This is an instance of reasoning from concurrent presence anvaya and absence vyatireka: If both hold, then x which precedes y is its cause.

Thus, if a given meaning is understood when a given term or member of a set of terms is used and not understood when this is not used, then the comprehension of the meaning in question is said to be caused by the term, to which this meaning is attributed.

Assuming that words designate positive significands, in ordinary usage one thinks of the term go, "cow," as referring to something that one can see and speak of repeatedly, using the same term.

If one assumes that a word-meaning relation is learned between an instance of the term go and a particular cow and also assumes that when another instance of go is used it too can refer to this particular cow, then the reasoning procedure shown above is violated, since one now has y in the absence of x.

To assume that a separate relation is grasped between each instance of go and each individual vyakti cow has the consequence that no speaker can acquire the knowledge of such an infinite number of relations.

Various solutions are proposed to remedy the situation see Deshpande and Scharf Yet this is not the case: For example, a go-between saying this to a woman who is to meet a lover suggests it is time to set out, but a servant saying this to a Brahmin means to imply that it is time for his master to perform the evening prayer.

Indian Philosophy of Language

Sentence and Sentence Meaning Adherents of various schools of thought in ancient and medieval India adopted different views concerning sentences and their meanings. This thesis can be justified in so far as actual communication involves whole utterances, but it encounters the problems mentioned earlier in connection with words and their meanings: They maintain, however, that words and their constituent bases, affixes, and so forth are constructs posited in order to account for whole utterances.

The sentential meaning of any stretch one calls a sentence is now accounted for indirectly, through the meanings of individual words.Indian philosophy - The linguistic philosophies: Bhartrihari and Mandana-Mishra - The linguistic philosophers considered here are the grammarians led by Bhartrihari (7th century ce) and Mandana-Mishra (8th century ce); the latter, reputed to be a disciple of Kumarila, held views widely different from the Mimamsakas.

the indian linguistic philosophies a report submitted in fulfillment of the course requirements of the course: basic indian logic department of sanskrit pondicherry university year guide: dr. anil pratap giri students name: alice alex roll no.: department: earth science contents 1.

introduction 2. bhartrihari and mandanamishra 3. Theory of Sparta is a linguistic theory which was required to understand the problems of the theory of meaning.

It was employed by the grammarians to support their theory of word monism.

Indian Philosophy of Language - 3:AM Magazine

We Will Write A Custom Essay Sample On The indian linguistic philosophies. Indian philosophy refers to ancient philosophical traditions of the Indian subcontinent.

The principal schools are classified as either orthodox or heterodox – āstika or nāstika – depending on one of three alternate criteria: whether it believes the Vedas as a valid source of knowledge; whether the school believes in the premises of Brahman and Atman ; and whether the school believes in afterlife and .

Interview by Richard Marshall. Malcolm Keating’s research is centred on Indian philosophy, in particular Mīmāṃsā and other orthoprax Indian traditions. His focus is on the philosophy of language and related topics such as epistemology and logic. Indian philosophy refers to ancient philosophical traditions of the Indian subcontinent.

The principal schools are classified as either orthodox or heterodox – āstika or nāstika – depending on one of three alternate criteria: whether it believes the Vedas are a valid source of knowledge; whether the school believes in the premises of Brahman and .

The indian linguistic philosophies
Indian Linguistic Philosophy - Bibliography - PhilPapers